Securing your wallet - Bitcoin Wiki

[X-Post] [Advice] Brother committed suicide. Left behind truecrypt containing bitcoin wallet

[x-post from /cryptography] I know this is a long shot, but it's worth a try. It seems like this may be the best subreddit to post this to.
My brother committed suicide about a year ago. He had given me a thumb drive with a truecrypt container (given to me about 9 months before he passed) which has his bitcoin wallet. He gave it to me in case of emergency, for his use. He did not share the password with me to decrypt.
After his death, my parents unveiled a second thumb drive that he gave to them along with a password. It was given to them a few months after he gave one to me. The problem is the password did not work ("invalid password or not a truecrypt container"). I can't imagine him giving my parents a password that wouldn't work. Perhaps the container's headers are corrupt?
I'm not sure what my options are. I've looked at truecrack, but knowing my brother, he would not have used a simple passphrase. To give you an idea, he used a 30+ character phrase with the drive he gave to my parents (alphanumeric w/special chars).
I know there is a substantial amount of bitcoin, especially at today's market value, well over 100 coins. He had invested tens of thousands when it was around $100. He did extract his initial investment when it was hovering around $4-600.
Any and all advice is welcome. I'm trying to find a direction. The amount of money in that wallet would be life altering for me and my family. Every time I see a post on Reddit about the current market value of BTC, I feel sick to my stomach. I've tried to keep blinders on. Avoid reading/hearing anything related cryptocurrency because of it. I've had family members occasionally text/talk to me about it to which I don't reply.
I attempted using truecrack on the container that he had given to my parents in the event that he didn't give them the right password. I ran it for a couple of weeks before I gave up. I have not yet attempted on the drive he gave to me, mainly because I only recently found it when going through some boxes.
I know that if the thumbdrive he gave to my parents is corrupt, there's really nothing that can be done. Although I'm not sure if i'm missing something. However, if there is a way to crack the drive he gave me, it's highly likely that all of the info to access his wallet is in there. Again, I know it's a long shot, but I'd like to get some honest feedback and advice.
Thanks in advance.
Sidenote: The thumb drives had other files on them. I attempted to use those as keyfiles when decrypting my parents container, no luck. I have a feeling he added those as a deterrent. He named the files something obscure, with a file extensions to throw off whoever may see them.
I've taken backups of everything, and have them in multiple locations.
submitted by can_anyone_help_plz to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Advice] Brother committed suicide. Left behind truecrypt containing bitcoin wallet

I know this is a long shot, but it's worth a try. It seems like this may be the best subreddit to post this to.
My brother committed suicide about a year ago. He had given me a thumb drive with a truecrypt container (given to me about 9 months before he passed) which has his bitcoin wallet. He gave it to me in case of emergency, for his use. He did not share the password with me to decrypt.
After his death, my parents unveiled a second thumb drive that he gave to them along with a password. It was given to them a few months after he gave one to me. The problem is the password did not work ("invalid password or not a truecrypt container"). I can't imagine him giving my parents a password that wouldn't work. Perhaps the container's headers are corrupt?
I'm not sure what my options are. I've looked at truecrack, but knowing my brother, he would not have used a simple passphrase. To give you an idea, he used a 30+ character phrase with the drive he gave to my parents (alphanumeric w/special chars).
I know there is a substantial amount of bitcoin, especially at today's market value, well over 100 coins. He had invested tens of thousands when it was around $100. He did extract his initial investment when it was hovering around $4-600.
Any and all advice is welcome. I'm trying to find a direction. The amount of money in that wallet would be life altering for me and my family. Every time I see a post on Reddit about the current market value of BTC, I feel sick to my stomach. I've tried to keep blinders on. Avoid reading/hearing anything related cryptocurrency because of it. I've had family members occasionally text/talk to me about it to which I don't reply.
I attempted using truecrack on the container that he had given to my parents in the event that he didn't give them the right password. I ran it for a couple of weeks before I gave up. I have not yet attempted on the drive he gave to me, mainly because I only recently found it when going through some boxes.
I know that if the thumbdrive he gave to my parents is corrupt, there's really nothing that can be done. Although I'm not sure if i'm missing something. However, if there is a way to crack the drive he gave me, it's highly likely that all of the info to access his wallet is in there. Again, I know it's a long shot, but I'd like to get some honest feedback and advice.
Thanks in advance.
submitted by can_anyone_help_plz to cryptography [link] [comments]

0.82 BTC in my TrueCrypt encrypted wallet, any advice? /r/Bitcoin

0.82 BTC in my TrueCrypt encrypted wallet, any advice? /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: [X-Post] [Advice] Brother committed suicide. Left behind truecrypt containing bitcoin wallet /r/techsupport

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: [X-Post] [Advice] Brother committed suicide. Left behind truecrypt containing bitcoin wallet /techsupport submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

If I have encrypted my wallet with truecrypt, can bitcoins be stolen while the wallet is mounted?

Should I keep the wallet unmounted and mount it only when I need to use for max security?
submitted by translationn to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin wallet on TrueCrypt on Google Drive

Pros and Cons- I'm thinking of creating a small (3mb) TrueCrypt volume that I store on my Google Drive. This will then sync the file to the cloud automatically. The biggest security hole then becomes Google Drive, as it's password is the shortest of all in the process to get to my bitcoins. Do you think this is safe? To get to my bitcoins, you would have to get into my Google Drive, then know to look and find my wallet file, then know the encryption password to open that up. And from there, I could further secure it in MultiBit by encrypting the file, correct?
submitted by themann00 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[X-Post] [Advice] Brother committed suicide. Left behind truecrypt containing bitcoin wallet /r/Bitcoin

[X-Post] [Advice] Brother committed suicide. Left behind truecrypt containing bitcoin wallet /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

TrueCrypt is gone!!! I was using it to save Bitcoin wallets on Dropbox

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/truecrypt-goes-way-lavabit-developers-shut-it-down-without-warning-1450467
This came to me as a complete shocker!!
Who was using it to save sensitive data on the cloud? Do you think there is a backdoor or that similar to Lavabit, they shut it down to avoid that situation?
It is wierd though, I do remember posting a few weeks ago on their forum about the keylogger issue when typing in the password to access the encrypted drive
submitted by Mordan to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How unsafe is using only bitcoin-qt and truecrypted the wallet.dat?

I get, that you should be going throu the hole "Offline PC/armory" stuff - i will do this, but not in the near future.
My Passwords are usually 25-30 Letter long, with numbers and stuff. So, if i understand correctly, the wallet.dat is the important part of the bitcoin-qt and that is have to protect?
submitted by Levikus to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Butter that paid with pedo pesos to download CP got arrested thanks to blokechain analysis

So this subreddit is basically a bunch of pedos discussing weather or not they will eventually be caught for using a bullet proof hosting server that got busted and hosted CP, at least one of them got caught (unfortunately got released with no charges so far)
https://old.reddit.com/depfile_discussion/comments/g3s77v/my_experience/
One of the most frequent posters and mods in that sub is named u/lolita_lopez2, definitely not a pedo right?
Edit: Still reading around through that sub, wow these guys know a lot about CP, given their tone and the lack of any shame or disgust towards pedophiles, I can only conclude that these guys are pedophiles, they aren't just discussing the case because of an interest in cybercrime, they are there to reassure each other that they won't get caught.
Since the sub is now set to private, this is what he said.
I only just found this sub. I'm posting info that might be helpful, and I'll try to answer questions if I can.
I was arrested in 2018, released under investigation (this means no restrictions on my freedom and movement), and the investigation was closed recently, with all my property returned. I'm not going to give dates.
I used the following security measures: encrypted folders with truecrypt, separate devices, vpn, tor, fake cock.li email, throwaway usernames, bitcoin purchased from the street.
I was caught when they connected a transaction to another wallet to another wallet to an old exchange account which had been deleted for years (from when I first started using bitcoin, it was a stupid mistake). Unfortunately the exchange account was verified with my name and address. I probably consolidated my coins into a new wallet at some point, which could be connected in some way to another wallet I used. In retrospect, bitcoin transactions are permanent so it doesn't matter how long ago and how many transactions/wallets ago they were, if it looks like a simple transfer from wallet to wallet, they can calculate a likelihood that the wallet owners are the same person.
The transaction was from an account which they linked to a couple of downloads of specific files that they had verified was illegal. Note that they only identified a couple of files, I don't know if that's because they had only identified a small number of files in total, or if they stopped there for me because that's all they needed to proceed.
The downloads were made at least a year before, probably much more because I had stopped using depfile for a long time already. They had no hard evidence it was me but that connection was all they needed to raid me and confiscate all devices in my home. I spent a day in jail while they searched every corner of my home, then a recorded interview with lawyer present, then they sent me home. I was not under any restrictions, I left the country on holiday several times without issue and if I wanted to, I probably could have disappeared to another country.
They did recover some deleted files (my mistake) and asked about it in follow-up interviews. The files were definitely reviewed by a human because they were described in detail. In the end I wasn't charged (not enough evidence or not serious enough to warrant further resources in court) and the investigation was closed. Almost all property was returned. Some devices were destroyed because they contained questionable material or looked like they did at some point in the past.
A couple of points to note:
The police were very discreet, probably because they didn't have hard evidence and were wary of making a false accusation. After everything, nobody knows about what happened (I live alone). They told neighbors that I was assisting them with a case. Work/colleagues/family/friends are unaware. I did have to lie about why I had no electronic devices left in my home.
The search through my home was very thorough, they really went through every bag/containecorner. All the pockets in all my clothes were checked. A whole team of 4 or 5 people spent 12 hours in my home while I spent the day alone in a cell, waiting for a lawyer to arrive.
Despite being so thorough, they missed a few devices (which weren't even hidden), and took some non-electronic objects by accident.
No cloud accounts were accessed (or I am simply not aware of it).
No questions were asked about my encrypted folders.
They did demand passwords for all devices/drives (which I am legally required to give). I think if I had used encrypted drives instead of encrypted folders, I would probably be screwed.
Some files were definitely reviewed/watched by humans (they were described in follow-up interviews) but for the most part it was probably automated, and just flagged up some of the more suspicious files. This is probably why the encrypted folders were ignored. If a human had looked at my drives, they would have easily noticed a huge chunk of it was inaccessible.
After using the phones that were returned, it looks like they they may have gone through it by hand because every app was open, file browser, download history, chrome history tab was open, etc. Or maybe that's just a side effect of whatever tool they use for android phones. I know that they can search hard drives without leaving a trace (by cloning the drive or blocking writes).
They fixed my old broken hard drives and phones.
If you haven't heard anything by now, you're probably in the clear. (No promises)
submitted by Alpra_Cream to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Move your coins off of exchanges and use SegWit wallets - you need to do these two things right now

Move your coins off of exchanges and use SegWit wallets - you need to do these two things right now submitted by HURCANADA to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Paul Solotshi Calder Le Roux, the real satoshi

A few days ago, Craig Wright's court case posted a redacted document where Craig described his involvement in bringing down a crime boss.
https://www.courtlistener.com/recap/gov.uscourts.flsd.521536/gov.uscourts.flsd.521536.187.0.pdf
Most of the mentions were censored, but they missed one on page 4 (a footnote carried over from page 3). Over the last few days I've been re-reading all of the documents I can get my hands on, and I've figured it out.
Here's the real crypto black pill: Bitcoin was a project of a evil genius whose full name is Paul Solotshi Calder Le Roux. He intended it simply for the purpose of money laundering (a use case which is clearly seeing fruition even today with the likes of Crypto Capital). Unfortunately, soon after he went quiet with the Satoshi identity, he was captured by law enforcement, and he's going to spend the rest of his life rotting in jail cell.
But how does Craig Wright fit into all this?
Craig Wright was an employee of Le Roux, who was vaguely aware of the bitcoin project. Craig was an informant who helped bring down Le Roux, and after his arrest, Craig managed (via long time friend and partner in crime, Dave Kleiman) to get his hands on the wallets that hold a million bitcoins, but unfortunately for Craig, all of Solotshi's coins are locked away in secure TrueCrypt volumes (TrueCrypt being another software that Le Roux developed). He has been trying for years to crack them but with no success.
Another of Craig's long time friends, Calvin Ayre, has set up warehouses of computers to try to crack Solotshi's password and unlock the vast fortunes; his mining activity is simply a front to make these massive datacenters look legitimate. Craig is being set up as 'the real satoshi' so that when the coins are finally unlocked, they can legitimately sell them off.
submitted by chiamalogio to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Trust in code, or trust in people / companies?

My opinion:
When it comes to the software I can choose to run, it matters more that I can trust the code.
Whether it is binary or source code - what matters most to me is that I have a verifiable state of it, which I have tested i.e. used practically. [1]
Programs changing under the hood is dangerous. There have been lots of recent public cases where code on public repositories has been changed maliciously, affecting a great number of downstream users. [2]
This can happen with open source or closed source (e.g. when you get your programs or parts of them delivered to you from some vendor in pure executable form).
People change their minds, they update their software, sometimes in ways that break your own (if you're a developer) or cause you harm as a user, if you depend on them. [3] This can be unintentional (bugs), or intentional (malware).
They can also be compromised in many ways. Bribery, blackmail, or other manipulation [4, 5]
Companies change owners and expand, potentially affecting their loyalties and subjecting them to new jurisdictional coercion.
While we do assign a level of trust to people and companies with whom we transact, I put it to you that when it comes to running software that needs to be secure and do what it claims, it's better not to extend much trust to the developer, but better to make them demonstrate why their code should be worthy of your trust.
In this way, you can build a library of code that you trust to keep you (and your loved ones) secure.
Paying someone money doesn't guarantee your security. Take a look at the clouds.
Notes:
[1] as an example of such binary software, one could recount a certain full disk encryption software which was later discontinued by its authors, see https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/05/truecrypt-is-not-secure-official-sourceforge-page-abruptly-warns/
[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Npm_%28software%29#Notable_breakages
[3] https://www.trendmicro.com/vinfo/hk-en/security/news/cybercrime-and-digital-threats/hacker-infects-node-js-package-to-steal-from-bitcoin-wallets
[4] https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-security-nsa-rsa/exclusive-nsa-infiltrated-rsa-security-more-deeply-than-thought-study-idUSBREA2U0TY20140331
[5] https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/12/report-nsa-paid-rsa-to-make-flawed-crypto-algorithm-the-default/
submitted by LovelyDay to btc [link] [comments]

Hashcat benchmark on GeForce NOW

OpenCL Platform #1: NVIDIA Corporation

* Device #1: Tesla P40, 6144/24576 MB allocatable, 30MCU

Benchmark relevant options:

* --optimized-kernel-enable

Hashmode: 0 - MD5

Speed.#1.........: 32855.6 MH/s (59.28ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:512 Thr:1024 Vec:4

Hashmode: 100 - SHA1

Speed.#1.........: 11339.3 MH/s (86.21ms) @ Accel:256 Loops:256 Thr:512 Vec:2

Hashmode: 1400 - SHA2-256

Speed.#1.........: 3956.8 MH/s (61.48ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:64 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 1700 - SHA2-512

Speed.#1.........: 1283.4 MH/s (59.73ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:32 Thr:640 Vec:1

Hashmode: 2500 - WPA-EAPOL-PBKDF2 (Iterations: 4096)

Speed.#1.........: 527.4 kH/s (56.26ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:32 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 1000 - NTLM

Speed.#1.........: 56126.1 MH/s (69.61ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:1024 Thr:1024 Vec:2

Hashmode: 3000 - LM

Speed.#1.........: 25822.0 MH/s (76.24ms) @ Accel:256 Loops:1024 Thr:256 Vec:1

Hashmode: 5500 - NetNTLMv1 / NetNTLMv1+ESS

Speed.#1.........: 27994.2 MH/s (69.78ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:512 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 5600 - NetNTLMv2

Speed.#1.........: 2342.5 MH/s (51.96ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:32 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 1500 - descrypt, DES (Unix), Traditional DES

Speed.#1.........: 1129.1 MH/s (54.79ms) @ Accel:8 Loops:1024 Thr:256 Vec:1

Hashmode: 500 - md5crypt, MD5 (Unix), Cisco-IOS $1$ (MD5) (Iterations: 1000)

Speed.#1.........: 9874.0 kH/s (74.72ms) @ Accel:1024 Loops:1000 Thr:32 Vec:1

Hashmode: 3200 - bcrypt $2*$, Blowfish (Unix) (Iterations: 32)

Speed.#1.........: 18809 H/s (48.98ms) @ Accel:16 Loops:8 Thr:8 Vec:1

Hashmode: 1800 - sha512crypt $6$, SHA512 (Unix) (Iterations: 5000)

Speed.#1.........: 166.6 kH/s (72.22ms) @ Accel:512 Loops:128 Thr:32 Vec:1

Hashmode: 7500 - Kerberos 5 AS-REQ Pre-Auth etype 23

Speed.#1.........: 373.7 MH/s (83.17ms) @ Accel:256 Loops:64 Thr:64 Vec:1

Hashmode: 13100 - Kerberos 5 TGS-REP etype 23

Speed.#1.........: 373.9 MH/s (83.08ms) @ Accel:256 Loops:64 Thr:64 Vec:1

Hashmode: 15300 - DPAPI masterkey file v1 (Iterations: 23999)

Speed.#1.........: 88325 H/s (56.71ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:32 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 15900 - DPAPI masterkey file v2 (Iterations: 7999)

Speed.#1.........: 49797 H/s (78.09ms) @ Accel:256 Loops:128 Thr:32 Vec:1

Hashmode: 7100 - macOS v10.8+ (PBKDF2-SHA512) (Iterations: 35000)

Speed.#1.........: 16271 H/s (54.05ms) @ Accel:64 Loops:32 Thr:512 Vec:1

Hashmode: 11600 - 7-Zip (Iterations: 524288)

Speed.#1.........: 11789 H/s (59.33ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:128 Thr:768 Vec:1

Hashmode: 12500 - RAR3-hp (Iterations: 262144)

Speed.#1.........: 39596 H/s (72.02ms) @ Accel:4 Loops:16384 Thr:384 Vec:1

Hashmode: 13000 - RAR5 (Iterations: 32767)

Speed.#1.........: 43880 H/s (73.65ms) @ Accel:128 Loops:32 Thr:896 Vec:1

Hashmode: 6211 - TrueCrypt PBKDF2-HMAC-RIPEMD160 + XTS 512 bit (Iterations: 2000)

Speed.#1.........: 367.6 kH/s (82.29ms) @ Accel:64 Loops:32 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Hashmode: 13400 - KeePass 1 (AES/Twofish) and KeePass 2 (AES) (Iterations: 6000)

Speed.#1.........: 164.5 kH/s (62.68ms) @ Accel:512 Loops:128 Thr:32 Vec:1

Hashmode: 6800 - LastPass + LastPass sniffed (Iterations: 500)

Speed.#1.........: 2843.7 kH/s (59.11ms) @ Accel:64 Loops:62 Thr:896 Vec:1

Hashmode: 11300 - Bitcoin/Litecoin wallet.dat (Iterations: 199999)

Speed.#1.........: 5949 H/s (51.52ms) @ Accel:64 Loops:32 Thr:1024 Vec:1

Started: Tue Sep 03 08:29:05 2019
Stopped: Tue Sep 03 08:38:50 2019
submitted by KennyRX to hacking [link] [comments]

What's your biggest problem with Bitcoin ?

Software development team here.
We would like to hear from the community what are the most annoying\frustrating stuff you have with Bitcoin and would love to get a solution for ?
Feel free to talk about any problem, even if it seems unsolvable or too abstract (e.g. Bitcoin is not safe enough for the average user)
Edit:
After reading all the replies, I feel confident summarizing that the #1 problem of Bitcoin is probably lack of adoption.
And the main reasons of lack of adoption are probably ease of use and insufficient security.
We are a team of entrepreneurs and software developers that are going to spend the next following months-year on developing a new product.
One of the most appealing markets for us is the Bitcoin market.
We will try to learn us much as possible from your replies and try to tackle the problems head on.
submitted by MichaelEngstler to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I just lost 301BTC ($70,000+) on blockchain.info. USE 2FA / Cold wallets!

Today, as I was halfway through my workout at the gym, I get a notification on my Android phone: "You have transferred 301 BTC to 1HJ3tECDZA4Zpgux1qK9AXKpRYZWjXXK4"
Ugh. My entire savings gone. I put nearly every paycheck into buying bitcoins through Coinbase - not one of the early gpu miners =(
I had used 2 factor authentication with Coinbase, but did not have it enabled for blockchain.info, where I had transferred the coins to.
Not looking for pity, but hoping this serves as a warning to anyone not using cold storage or some level of 2 factor authentication for large amounts of BTC. I am also curious if I can find out how it happened. Malware on my Android phone or Macbook?
EDIT: Signed message from my main address: http://brainwallet.org/#verify?vrMsg=C%27est%20la%20vie&vrSig=G8f8rRAcL9%2BPcTTvDLCJu2G%2B46%2Bym2mZVLxoPQK7CQEEavo8QybaQEYiKVKzk0wFIyP7vs9bJG%2FBr04zT%2FXtmeU%3D
submitted by SatoshiChrist to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Basic Bitcoin security guide

Hello,
This post is to give you a quick introduction into Bitcoin security. While nobody can guarantee you 100% security, I hope to mitigate some problems you can run into. This is the “20% of effort to get you to 80% safe”.
First of all, you have to determine how much money you want to hold in Bitcoin and how much effort are you willing to put in. If you are happy just holding a few dollars worth and don’t care if you lose them, that’s one approach to take. For everyone else, lets get started.
Password strength
A lot of the times how secure your money is will be determined by the strength of your password. Since in the worst case scenario we are talking about someone trying to brute force your wallet, casual online passwords are too weak. Under 10 characters is too weak. Common words and phrases are too weak. Adding one number to a password at the end is too weak.
Moreover, you can consider your password much weaker if you:
If you want a really strong password:
Wallet security
Now we are getting to the meat of things.
There are a number of wallets available to store your hard earned bitcoins. If you have a decent amount of coins to store, you should look into software wallets - BitcoinQT, MultiBit, Armory or Electrum. They are among the best place to store your money safely (provided your computer is secure as well). Chose one you think best suits you, install it and encrypt your wallet file with your strong password. You should take your wallet file and back it up (location of the file is different for different clients, so you have to do some research as to where to find that file). Back it up on a CD, safe USB drive or the like. Keep them safe. If you lose that file, you will lose your money.
A quick word on deterministic wallets. Electrum and Armory allow you to create wallets from a seed. If you use the same seed later, you can recreate your wallet on other machines. With deterministic wallets, you only need to keep that seed secure to have access to your money.
In comparison, in BitcoinQT's traditional wallet, every address you use is random, meaning that after you send 50-100 outgoing transactions your backups can be obsolete. Always keep an up-to-date backup of such wallet file if possible.
Okay, sometimes you need to have your Bitcoins with you when you leave your computer. In this case, you should look into either online or mobile wallets. A staple for both of those is Blockchain.info, but there are others to chose from.
A good rule of thumb with these is to not store more money in them than you can afford to lose. They are best used as a convenient way of accessing some money, not storing your savings. Online wallets are especially vulnerable to their servers getting hacked and people’s money getting stolen.
What to keep in mind while using online wallets:
  • Use a secure password (the more money you have in them the stronger the password should be)
  • Always keep a backup of your wallet in case you need to recover your money
  • Whenever possible, enable two factor authentication
  • Don’t use your online wallets from unsafe computers
Cold storage
Sometimes you want to store your bitcoins for a long time in a safe place. This is called “cold storage”. There are a few ways one can do this.
First of all, paper wallets. They are nice for giving people small bitcoin gifts, but also for long-term storage if properly used. What you want to do is generate and print them offline. You can save the linked page for example and run that offline. If you are really paranoid, you can put it on read-only media and access that from a different computer. For really long term storage, use archival-grade paper.
Another approach to take is using a separate computer for storing your money that is offline 99+% of the time. You could set one up easily by buying an old laptop, reformatting it, installing Linux and a Bitcoin client. Generate an address on that machine and send money to it from your main wallet. Depending on how paranoid you are you can connect that computer to the Internet afterwards to synchronize data with the Bitcoin Network and then turn it off and put it away somewhere safe until it’s needed.
Brain wallets
Don’t. They are not for you. Unless you are a security-conscientious programmer, those are not for you.
Diversifying
Keeping all of your eggs in one basket is never a good thing. You should look into diversifying some of your Bitcoin assets in case your other storage methods fail. Some ways you can diversify:
  • Buy a physical Bitcoin. As long as you trust the coin creator such coins can be an effective cold storage
  • Invest - I wouldn’t recommend this for more than some trivial amount unless you know what you are doing, but investing in some Bitcoin stocks could be a way to get more money out of your bitcoins
How not to diversify:
  • Avoid keeping your bitcoins at exchanges or other online sites that are not your online wallets. Such sites can be closed down or disappear along with your money.
  • Alt-coins - there are few cryptocurrencies that are worthwhile, but most of them are just Bitcoin clones. If a currency brings nothing new, it’s worthless in comparison to Bitcoin. Namecoin is a distributed domain name server (although recently it had a fatal flaw uncovered, so be warned), Ripple is a distributed currency exchange and payment system. Litecoin will only be useful in case Bitcoin’s hashing algorithm gets compromised (very unlikely at this time). Beyond that there are few if any alt-coins that are a worthwhile way of diversifying.
Accepting payments and safety
We’ve covered safe ways to store money, now a quick note about bitcoin payments and their safety.
First of all, when you are sending a transaction, pay your fees. Transactions without fees can take forever to propagate, confirm and clear. This can cause you a lot of stress, so pay your fees.
Secondly, when accepting large Bitcoin payments (say you want to suddenly cash in a gold bar into bitcoins), wait for at the very least 1 confirmation on those transactions. 6 is best, but having even 1 confirmations is a lot better than having none. This is mainly a rule of thumb for the paranoid (I wouldn’t be doing this for most casual transaction), but maybe it will save you if you are dealing with some shady people.
Wrapping up...
That should cover the basics. If you want to read more about Bitcoin’s security in general, here is my master thesis on the subject. A lot of questions about Bitcoin and security have also been answered on Bitcoin StackExchange - be sure to check it out.
Comments and improvement suggestions welcome.
EDITS:
  • Removed link to insecure site
  • Removed random article section
  • Added information about deterministic wallets
submitted by ThePiachu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What are Blockchain.info doing about the 2X Hardfork?

Has there been any official announcement? Will I be able to use my unique phrase to unlock the 2X coin, like I could with BCH?
submitted by Taitou_UK to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Windows Bitcoin trojan in the wild.

submitted by Satoshi_Nakamoto to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Using Electrum and Bootable Ubuntu USB to Create a Secure Cold Storage Wallet

Here is a short guide that is hopefully newb friendly for creating a cold-storage wallet with Electrum. All you will need is at least one USB flash drive with at least 2 GB of free space, your PC, and pen & paper.
You will need The Universal USB Installer, as well as the Ubuntu .iso image file. Choose the 32 bit version to be safe. Download both, plug in your USB flash drive, and launch the installer. Select Ubuntu in Step 1 in the installer. Then in Step 2 browse and locate the Ubuntu .iso image file you downloaded. Then in Step 3 select the drive you have inserted, as well as click the box to format the drive and erase contents. Do NOT set a persistence as this will reduce the security. Then click create and wait for it to finish.
Once booted into Ubuntu, make sure to click "try ubuntu". You are only trying it out on the USB, and not installing it onto your main hard drive. The reason for using the bootable drive is everything exists in memory and mostly disappears when you shut down Ubuntu.
(It would be more ideal to install electrum in a complete cold environment, but I have heard that could cause some problems with Electrum at this time and it is best to install it while connected to the internet. But if you want true cold storage you must have zero internet connection at the time of creating the wallet. Since we are disconnecting before Electrum creates the seed, we should be good.)
At this point you are done, just shut down Ubuntu to make sure the evidence of the seed is erased. Then you can send Bitcoins to your cold storage wallet. You have effectively created a very secure cold storage wallet, in my opinion. To restore the cold wallet, just launch electrum and choose "restore wallet" option, type in your seed, and voila you have a hot wallet ready to spend again.
Extra: Using Truecrypt Encryption
Bonus tutorial is if you would prefer to save your seed on another USB or digital device. It is not recommended to do this, unless the seed in encrypted. Even then I would only leave it on a USB and not plug it into any hot device just to be safe. I would recommend Truecrypt although its possible the NSA has hacked Truecrypt, so use at your own risk.
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:stefansundin/truecrypt
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install truecrypt
Hit enter after each command. If it asks permission, press y. Sometimes I had problems getting commands to work in the past. For some reason first installing flash from the software center fixes the problem, but I have no idea why.
Choose a size for the file, probably 5 MB is enough, but by all means choose more if you want to hold more files. Click next and make sure to choose a SECURE password for the file. If you don't pick a good enough password it will be brute forced easily. Use numbers, letters, capitals, lowercase, symbols, and make it long as possible. Try to have it something you can memorize if possible. Then click next. Then format it as FAT, and click next. Move your mouse around for entropy and then click Format, and your truecrypt container has been created.
I think this is a decent easy to follow tutorial. Hopefully this can help some newbies out, if I made any mistakes please feel free to correct me.
Edit: Sorry formatting sucks.
submitted by btcfreedom to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin phishing scam that got me! Please be aware!

I received an email from one of the prominent Bitcoiners in my community who I have had email correspondence with before. I had emailed him about my NumiSalis physical Bitcoin project and I got an email from him about Physical Bitcoin at the Texas Bitcoin Conference with a link to what looked like a google drive document.
My guard was down and I did not check where the link went. It looks like the scam was to obtain my google credentials. I did not realize I had been compromised until another Bitcoin friend told me that he got something from me and then a friend of his got something from him. I did not get a reply from my friend because by that time a filter had been set up in my gmail account so I would never see emails pertaining to this scam.
I believe this is not a fast acting bot. I believe this is someone who is reading email and selecting targets that are believed to have bitcoin. I would assume they are looking for people who store wallets on google drive.
If you remember getting some weird google doc email that did not work please check your filters (Gear->Settings->Filters) to see if you have a weird filter set up to mark emails as read and then delete them based on a text search.
submitted by bitscavenger to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

found old wallet. how do i check if it has something inside?

Hey all.
I'm not into mining, but back in 2011 I remember learning about bitcoin and being interested in the concept, so I gave it a try.
I have literally 0 memory about what I did at the time, I must have followed some tutorial and set up a miner for a brief period of time (couple days, maybe).
Anyway, I found the wallet I was instructed to create at the time, encrypted in a truecrypt partition, which I am able to decrypt and mount.
How can I check if it has something inside? All I have in this partition is a bunch of .dat, .log, and some __db.001, __db.002 and so on.
If I can be more specific, ask straight away. Thanks in advance
EDIT: gonna install & sync bitcoin core tomorrow, after freeing some disk space.
To everyone who advised to backup, thanks, I had already done that but that's an advice that never gets repeated enough.
If anybody wants to send me scripts, you may as well post them in the comments or save your time and mine, I'm not clueless.
I'll be updating this with results, thanks for the help!
EDIT2: sadly, no coins. thanks everybody for your help, and good luck with your coins!
submitted by bcbeg_throwaway to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Up and Running with Peercoin - 05 Securing Wallet with TrueCrypt Bitcoin OX Excdev Wallet introduce Ripple XRP How we create Bitcoin wallet Wahab tech  #part 1 - YouTube How To Encrypt Dogecoin Wallet  Crypto Currency Wallet ... HOW TO CREATE AN OFFLINE SAFE CRYPTO WALLET

Your Bitcoin wallet contains all of the private keys necessary for spending your received transactions. If you delete your wallet without a backup, then you no longer have the authorization information necessary to claim your coins, and the coins associated with those keys are lost forever. The wallet contains a pool of queued keys. By default there are 100 keys in the key pool. The size of ... Your Bitcoin wallet contains all of the private keys necessary for spending your received transactions. If you delete your wallet without a backup, then you no longer have the authorization information necessary to claim your coins, and the coins associated with those keys are lost forever. The wallet contains a pool of queued keys. By default there are 100 keys in the key pool. The size of ... Bitcoin wallet on TrueCrypt on Google Drive. Pros and Cons- I'm thinking of creating a small (3mb) TrueCrypt volume that I store on my Google Drive. This will then sync the file to the cloud automatically. The biggest security hole then becomes Google Drive, as it's password is the shortest of all in the process to get to my bitcoins. Do you think this is safe? To get to my bitcoins, you would ... Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money … Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. r/Bitcoin. log in sign up. User account menu. 1. Bitcoin Wallets with TrueCrypt OS encryption. Close. 1. Posted by u/[deleted] 6 years ago. Archived. Bitcoin Wallets with TrueCrypt OS encryption. I feel my regular windows computer is ... Mithilfe von Truecrypt können Bitcoin Besitzer mit simplen Parametern ihre wallet.dat vor Trojanern verstecken und die Gefahr eines Diebstahl der Bitcoins somit deutlich verringern. Obwohl Truecrypt als sicher gilt, bietet das Programm keinen vollständigen Schutz gegen den Diebstahl von Bitcoins. Empfehlenswert ist die Truecrypt Funktion in einem separaten Netzwerk zu nutzen oder auf einem ...

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Up and Running with Peercoin - 05 Securing Wallet with TrueCrypt

How To Encrypt Dogecoin Wallet. How To Secure your Crypto Wallet with password Protected. This is so easy way in this video Learn how to Protect a Crytpo Wal... BitcoinOX - The world’s powerful blockchains wallet. Store, send and receive crypto with the Bitcoin OX wallet. The Bitcoin OX Wallet supports Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Bitcoin Cash (BCH ... The Bitcoin OX Wallet supports Bitcoin (BTC),... Skip navigation Sign in. Search. Loading... Close. This video is unavailable. ... TrueCrypt - Full access to xpub, xpriv, seed , addresses - Only ... Simple tutorial for beginners about how to create a cryptocurrency wallet and securely back up Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash funds. BTC.com is a cryptocurrency wa... Run truecrypt and create an encryption container for your wallet. Be sure to use a strong password and by all means make sure you remember it! Mount tc container (It just mounts as a new drive ...

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